Autonomy and Relatedness in Early Adolescent Friendships as Predictors of Short- and Long-term Academic Success

Loeb, E. L., Davis, A. A., Costello, M. A., & Allen, J. (2019). Autonomy and Relatedness in Early Adolescent Friendships as Predictors of Short- and Long-term Academic Success. Social Development.

Abstract

This study examined early adolescent autonomy and relatedness during disagreements with friends as key social competencies likely to predict academic achievement during the transition to high school and academic attainment into early adulthood. A sample of 184 adolescents was followed through age 29 to assess predictions to academic success from observed autonomy and relatedness during a disagreement task with a close friend. Observed autonomy and relatedness at age 13 predicted relative increases in grade point average (GPA) from 13 to 15, and greater academic attainment by age 29, after accounting for baseline GPA. Findings remained after accounting for peer acceptance, social competence, scholastic competence, externalizing and depressive symptoms, suggesting a key role for autonomy, and relatedness during disagreements in helping adolescents navigate challenges in the transition to high school and beyond.
Last updated on 12/13/2021