Autonomy and Relatedness in Early Adolescent Friendships as Predictors of Short- and Long-term Academic Success

Citation:

Loeb, E. L., Davis, A. A., Costello, M. A., & Allen, J. P. (2019). Autonomy and Relatedness in Early Adolescent Friendships as Predictors of Short- and Long-term Academic Success. Social Development.

Abstract:

This study examined early adolescent autonomy and re-

latedness during disagreements with friends as key social

competencies likely to predict academic achievement dur-

ing the transition to high school and academic attainment

into early adulthood. A sample of 184 adolescents was fol-

lowed through age 29 to assess predictions to academic

success from observed autonomy and relatedness during a

disagreement task with a close friend. Observed autonomy

and relatedness at age 13 predicted relative increases in

grade point average (GPA) from 13 to 15, and greater aca-

demic attainment by age 29, after accounting for baseline

GPA. Findings remained after accounting for peer accept-

ance, social competence, scholastic competence, external-

izing and depressive symptoms, suggesting a key role for

autonomy, and relatedness during disagreements in help-

ing adolescents navigate challenges in the transition to high

school and beyond.

Link

Last updated on 06/24/2020